LEARNING


Tracy Hosheit had a lifelong interest in architecture. But he initially chose a different career path, spending 20 years working in department stores. In 2005, he enrolled in architectural technology at Spokane Community College (SCC).

“I needed to get back to work quickly, and the two-year program was intense and packed with courses I needed to enter into a field I started out of high school and I wanted to finish,” he says.

In addition to learning about building codes, AutoCAD and carpentry math, Tracy took a job prep class. “I didn’t think I needed it,” he says. “But the instructors were very involved in helping me build a great résumé, and I was able to coordinate a great internship.” In fact, he spent his last quarter of the program at a local consulting firm where he gained experience and college credits.

WORKING


Tracy graduated from SCC in 2007, and he always planned to work at an architecture firm. “I never saw myself working for anyone other than an architect. I just wanted to draw plans for buildings,” he says.

But from the beginning, his instructors at SCC explained there is a lot more that can be done with this degree. These skills are in demand at a lot of companies. Tracy started at Avista, an energy company involved in the production, transmission and distribution of energy, in 2008. He’s now an assistant design drafter.

“Now that I’m at Avista, and I’m drawing circuit wires, telecom racks and substation panel houses, it’s just as rewarding as windows, doors and walls,” he says.

Tracy - Avista drafter

WORKING


Tracy graduated from SCC in 2007, and he always planned to work at an architecture firm. “I never saw myself working for anyone other than an architect. I just wanted to draw plans for buildings,” he says.

But from the beginning, his instructors at SCC explained there is a lot more that can be done with this degree. These skills are in demand at a lot of companies. Tracy started at Avista, an energy company involved in the production, transmission and distribution of energy, in 2008. He’s now an assistant design drafter.

“Now that I’m at Avista, and I’m drawing circuit wires, telecom racks and substation panel houses, it’s just as rewarding as windows, doors and walls,” he says.

BELONGING


His skills are put to good use at Avista. “Drawing vaults under the sidewalks of downtown Spokane was something I did right from the beginning,” he says. “And I helped an engineer who wanted to retire update all of his designs so he could retire and know that the downtown distribution electric network was up to date.”

He loves the ability to work on many different projects that benefit Spokane and our surrounding communities.

“I work with a variety of engineers. I update drawings to reflect improvements to our system, and I work on a variety of things,” he says. “I’m never bored.”